Wednesday, February 21, 2007

Hardaway's Comments

Former NBA player, Tim Hardaway uttered some crudely stated comments about being on a team with homosexual players.

"I hate gay people, so I let it be known. I don't like gay people and I don't like to be around gay people. I am homophobic."

Hardaway's public condemnation was thorough. Homosexual or pro-homosexual commenters seized on his comments and implied that this hatred is implicit in heterosexual culture. This is the same tactic that is used by 'civil rights' advocates when someone criticizes excesses or antisocial behavior by blacks. Even Bill Cosby was lacerated for that.

Michael Medved has written a thoughtful article on that closely parallels my own perception of this situation.

Here are the concluding excerpts:

"Many gay activists suggest that this near-universal straight male repulsion at the idea of sex with another man is merely the product of cultural conditioning: a learned prejudice that ought to be unlearned. This represents the core message of gay pride parades and even the drive for same-sex marriage: an effort to persuade all of society that gay sex is as beautiful as straight sex, and to “cure” men of their visceral disgust at the very thought of what two (or more) male homosexuals do with one another."

"According to the “enlightened” advocates of gay liberation, this disgust gets to the very essence of “homophobia” – an altogether unjustified fear and distaste for male-on-male physical intimacy. When Hardaway says “I hate gay people” what he suggests at the deepest level is that he feels revolted by the very notion of same-sex eroticism and that he’d prefer not to face the distraction of such thoughts in the locker room or on the court."

"In this sense, the reluctance to team (in athletics or the military) with announced homosexuals isn’t bigotry, it’s common sense. The recent “Astronaut Love Triangle” provides a pointed reminder of the way that even disciplined military careerists can be diverted, even ruined, by attraction, eroticism and romance."

"Those who insist that basketball teams or submarine crews must welcome gay recruits must, for the sake of consistency, argue for the same welcome to teammates of the opposite gender. That notion – that a male player could, for instance, join a WNBA team without serious problems – shows the way that political correctness now seems to deny the obvious, often overwhelming potency of human sexuality."

"Those who suggest that a guy could shower with young female athletes without risk of arousal, or that a gay guy could shower with young male athletes with problems or discomfort, don’t merely defy common sense. They ignore human nature."

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